MLA vs. APA: What’s The Difference?

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MLA vs. APA – it can be difficult to keep track of the many different citation styles that exist, and it’s even harder to figure out which one is best for your field of study or discipline. Find out in this blog article what the difference is between MLA VS. APA, why each one is popular with its own communities, and how you might go about choosing which one to use for your own work.

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เว็บตรงไม่ผ่านเอเย่นต์ What are MLA and APA citation formats?

There are two popular citation formats that students often use for their essay writing service: MLA vs. APA. Both formats have their own unique guidelines that must be followed in order to create a correctly formatted citation. Here is a brief overview of each format:

MLA Format:

The MLA format is typically used for papers in the humanities. It uses a parenthetical citation system, which means that citations are included within the text of the paper in parentheses. The MLA format also requires that a Works Cited page be included at the end of the paper, which lists all of the sources that were used in the paper.

APA Format:

The APA format is typically used for papers in the social sciences. It uses an in-text citation system, which means that citations are included within the text of the paper but are not placed in parentheses. The APA format also requires a reference list at the end of the paper, which lists all of the sources that were used in the paper.

Why use one instead of the other?

There are a few key reasons to use one style over the other. MLA is more common in the humanities, while APA is more common in the social sciences. MLA uses parenthetical citations within the text, while APA uses in-text citations followed by a reference list.

 MLA is generally easier to use than APA because it requires less punctuation and has fewer rules. However, both styles have their merits and it is ultimately up to the writer to decide which style to use.

How to cite sources in MLA vs. APA

When it comes to citing sources in MLA vs. APA style, there are some key differences to keep in mind. MLA (Modern Language Association) style is typically used for humanities papers, while APA (American Psychological Association) style is most often used for scientific or social science papers.

Here are some basic guidelines for citing sources in each style:

MLA:

-Include the author’s last name and page number(s) in parentheses at the end of the sentence where the source is referenced.

-If you’re quoting directly from the source, also include the specific page number(s).

-If no author is given, start with the title of the source.

APA: 

-Include the author’s last name and year of publication in parentheses at the end of the sentence where the source is referenced. 

-If you’re quoting directly from the source, also include the specific page number(s).

How to format an essay in MLA and APA

There are a few major formatting styles used in academic writing, MLA and APA among them. Though they share some similarities, they also have important differences. These differences can be confusing for students, who may wonder which style to use for their next paper. This guide will explain the key differences between MLA and APA formatting styles.

MLA vs. APA: The Key Differences

1) Documentation Style: MLA style uses brief parenthetical citations in the text to point readers to more complete information about sources in the Works Cited page at the end of the paper. APA style uses a combination of in-text citations and a reference list, with each source having a full citation on the reference list.

2) Spacing: MLA papers are double spaced, with no extra space between paragraphs. APA papers are single spaced, but with an extra space between paragraphs or sections.

3) Title Page: MLA papers do not require a title page; all information goes on the first page (including your name, instructor’s name, course number, and due date). APA papers require a title page with a running head (a short version of your paper’s title), the title of your paper, your name, your institutional affiliation (school), and author note (if required by your instructor).

4) Headings: MLA papers do not typically use headings or subheadings to organize information; if you need to include them , they should be very simple (e.g., “First Point,” “Second Point”). APA papers use a four-level heading system to organize information:

Level 1: Centered, Boldface, Uppercase and Lowercase Heading

Level 2: Flush Left, Boldface, Uppercase and Lowercase Heading

Level 3: Indented, boldface, lowercase paragraph heading ending with a period.

Level 4: Indented, italicized, lowercase paragraph heading ending with a period.

5) Pagination: MLA papers do not require page numbers on the first page; if your instructor requests them, they should be placed in the upper right corner of the paper. APA papers require page numbers on the title page and throughout the paper; they should be placed in the upper right corner.

Conclusion

MLA and APA are two of the most common citation styles. They have their own unique rules and guidelines that must be followed in order to format your paper correctly. While MLA is typically used for humanities papers, APA is more often used in the sciences. Regardless of which citation style you need to use, it is important to familiarize yourself with both so that you can choose the one that best suits your needs.